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Visualize 600MHz Reserved Spectrum September 07, 2017 06:30

With the September 2017 release of our Mobile Carrier - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool, we have also added the ability to visualize and track the 600MHz reserved spectrum by county or by market.

In our Spectrum Grid default view, you are able to visualize which spectrum blocks are designated as reserved for the counties in each of the most populated Cellular Market Area (CMA) markets.



To display the reserved spectrum for all of the counties within a Partial Economic Area (PEA) market, you can sort the county data using the PEA # column.


What portion of the US Population can Dish reach with its License Portfolio? September 05, 2017 06:30

With the September 2017 release of our Mobile Carrier - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool, we have added three new charts that provide insights into the US Population that each carrier can serve with each channel in their wireless spectrum portfolio, each frequency band, and each band classification.

Licensed POPs by Channel:

With our Mobile Carrier - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool, you can analyze over 1900 carriers and spectrum holders in a similar fashion to our Dish analysis. In the chart below, we examine the population that Dish could serve with each of the channels in their license portfolio.  For example, Dish's 700MHz E Block spectrum reaches nearly 250 million people while their AWS3 A1 Block reaches 300 million people.

 

Licensed POPs by Frequency Band:

This chart shows the cumulative population that can be served by all of a carrier's channels in a frequency band.  Where the Licensed POPs by channel chart shows the population served by each of Dish's 600MHz channels; none of which serve more than 200 million people; with Dish's overall 600MHz spectrum, they can reach nearly the total 322 million US population.

Licensed POPs by Band Classification:

This chart shows the cumulative population that can be served by all of a carrier's low-band, mid-band, or high-band spectrum.  This is an important perspective when you consider low-band spectrum being a traditional coverage layer with mid-band spectrum being traditionally a capacity layer.  Dish's current spectrum portfolio provides them with the ability to serve the entire US population both with coverage spectrum and capacity spectrum.


Dish's AWS-3 Licenses - Back in Play August 31, 2017 06:30

 Last week the US Court of Appeals  determined that the Dish had too much control of its affiliates (Northstar Wireless and SNR Wireless) and the FCC acted properly by denying both affiliates their combined $3.3 Billion in bidding credits which ultimately lead to Northstar and SNR giving back many of their AWS-3.    In Dish's favor, the court determined that the FCC needed to provide Northstar and SNR with the opportunity to revise their contracts with Dish to comply with the issue of control.    This opens the opportunity for Dish to regain some of the AWS-3 licenses they collectively won at the auction.  Below we have listed the licenses and channels that Northstar and SNR each returned to the FCC.

 

   

   


Where Else will T-Mobile Deploy 600MHz - LTE? August 16, 2017 11:30

Today, T-Mobile announced further details on the deployment plans for their 600MHz spectrum.  Let's review what we indicated back in April.

The green areas are the areas that we expected T-Mobile to deploy a 5x5 LTE channel using their 600MHz spectrum.  Let's check these areas with the press release:

  • Wyoming         
  • Northwest Oregon     
  • West Texas     
  • Southwest Kansas     
  • Oklahoma panhandle     
  • Western North Dakota     
  • Maine     
  • Coastal North Carolina     
  • Central Pennsylvania     
  • Central Virginia     
  • Eastern Washington     

Central Pennsylvania appears to be our only miss in this T-Mobile list.  It is strange that T-Mobile is emphasizing a 600MHz deployment in an area they already control the 700MHz -A Block spectrum.


Tracking the FirstNet Opt-in Responses and their Cumulative Effect (Licensed Population) August 08, 2017 06:30

As more states have have announced that they have agreed to opt-in for a nationwide public-safety broadband network that will be built and operated by AT&T, we are going to look at Allnet Insights' tools to see several ways that the effects of these opt-ins can both be seen and analyzed.  All of our products are updated monthly to reflect the continuous change in the US licensed spectrum landscape.

The first view is the county by county view in the Web Spectrum Viewer.  In the screen shot below, we are looking at the current owners of the public-safety spectrum (the right 2 columns) which highlight the counties/states where Firstnet (FSN) is still the assigned current owner.  In this view, you can see the New Jersey counties in the New York CMA, the New Jersey counties in the Philadelphia CMA, and the Michigan counties in the Detroit CMA; are all opting in for an AT&T operated network.

Selecting one of the county_channel cells coded with FSN (Bronx county, NY) will reveal a detailed view of a non-opt-in county.  FirstNet is still licensed for that channel, and the current operator, but AT&T is still expected to be the future operator.

An AT&T coded cell (Somerset county, NJ) will reveal a detailed view of a opt-in county.  AT&T is indicated as the licensee, as well as the current and future operator of that channel.

Last, we are going to use the Channel Licensed POPs module from the Mobile Carrier - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool to determine how much of the US Population is locked in with AT&T operating the FirstNet spectrum.

Looking under the column for PSBB (Public Safety Broadband), you can see that with the existing 6 states that have opted-in, AT&T controls the FirstNet spectrum over a population of 42 million or roughly 13% of the US population (322 million total).  You can also see the population percentages that AT&T can reach with each of the other 700 MHz channels that they own or lease across the country.

 


Comparing the Millimeter Wave Deals June 23, 2017 06:30

Yesterday Allnet Insights & Analytics presented at the Wells Fargo 5G forum.  Below are several of the slides that describe the millimeter wave spectrum holdings for each of the parties involved in the current millimeter wave deals. Each of these slides is a direct analysis output from our Millimeter Wave - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool.  In these slides we have selected 8 carriers from the 173 carriers available in the tool. The first slide compares the National Weighted Average spectrum depth for each of the carriers.  Verizon's spectrum position is displayed as NextLink Wireless since Verizon at the time this slide was created was only leasing NextLink's spectrum.  In this set of slides we also highlight the risk surrounding the FiberTower transaction for AT&T.  The largest portion of the FiberTower transaction is for licenses that the FCC has terminated.  It is unknown how many of these licenses will be restored and added to AT&T's spectrum holdings.

 While the National Average slide highlights how much spectrum each carrier has on average across the county, networks are deployed using the available spectrum within a market.  The slides below highlight the amount of spectrum that each carrier has in a CMA (Cellular Market Area).  The Top 5 markets are in the first slide including Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Dallas and Houston.

 The remaining Top 10 markets are in the second slide: Philadelphia, Washington D.C., Detroit, Atlanta, and Boston. 

 The last slide highlights the estimated MHz-POPs for each of the carriers for their Millimeter Wave spectrum.  It is worth noting that the ranges for Mobile Carrier spectrum (600MHz-2.5GHz) for the National Carriers is 30B MHz-POPs to 65B MHz-POPs.  On this chart, the lowest range is 50B MHz-POPs.

 

 


FiberTower 24 GHz and 39 GHz Licenses (Active and Terminated) May 16, 2017 06:30

Allnet Insights' spectrum tools have historically only focused on spectrum licenses that are active or pending.  As we compared the size of the FiberTower/AT&T transaction using our active license data, it was clear that FiberTower's terminated licenses make up a large percentage of the transaction.  To allow our customers to evaluate the FiberTower transaction in terms of the nationwide scope and market by market effect, we have added the FiberTower terminated licenses to our FCC data set.  Since it is not clear how many of the terminated licenses will actually be reinstated, we have not included the terminated licenses in our current or future holdings data until they are formally restored by the FCC.  

Below we show FiberTower's active licenses compared to their terminated licenses in our Spectrum Grid for the 24 GHz band.  FiberTower's active licenses use the FBT carrier code while the terminated licenses use the FTT carrier code.  In this view FiberTower's active licenses only include the Chicago CMA counties while the terminated licenses cover Los Angeles county and all of the Philadelphia counties.

Looking at the 39GHz spectrum blocks, FiberTower's terminated licenses cover the A block channel for all of the New York counties and the H block for all of the New York counties that AT&T doesn't currently control.


AT&T | FiberTower | Straight Path 39GHz - Rectangular Area Licenses May 09, 2017 06:30

 One of the important aspect to understand about the millimeter band spectrum is the different types of licenses that compromise the 39 GHz Band.  One block of licenses were auctioned with Economic Area boundaries (similar to the AWS-3 Auction for H, I, and J licenses).  The second block of licenses are referred to as "Rectangular Licenses".  The rectangular licenses are defined by 4 latitude/longitude points making a rectangle.  These licenses include 1 or more of the 39 GHz channels and the rectangles encroach on the Economic Area licenses in quite a few of the US major metro areas.  Essentially the rectangular area licenses subtract license area and population from the Economic Area licenses.

Below is a map which reflects the active and terminated rectangular area licenses.  The terminated licenses (in red) represent some of the licenses that AT&T and FiberTower are attempting to restore.  The are also trying to restore a most of the 24 GHz licenses that FiberTowerhad terminated by the FCC.  Straight Path's consent agreement with the FCC required them to cancel all of their rectangular licenses so those are not included in the map.

Cancelling the Straight Path licenses accomplished two purposes.  First, it penalized Straight Path for lax controls on their construction and substantial service process.  Second, it cleaned up the licensing boundaries for the spectrum the FCC still controls enabling the FCC to auction complete counties for more 39 GHz channels.


T-Mobile Low Band Spectrum LTE versus 5G April 28, 2017 07:30

For this blog post, I am going to use Allnet Insights' Mobile Carrier - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool to estimate the 600 MHz spectrum that T-Mobile will use to deploy LTE and what will remain available to deploy 5G. 

To start this analysis, I will get T-Mobile 600 MHz and 700 MHz spectrum holdings at a county-level from the Company Analysis Module.

Using this data, we assign 10 MHz of 600 MHz spectrum to all counties where T-Mobile doesn't control 700 MHz spectrum.  This spectrum assignment would provide T-Mobile with similar LTE capacity across the United States. Note that there are a few counties where T-Mobile controls enough 700 MHz spectrum to enable a 10x10 LTE channel.

The remaining 600 MHz spectrum is expected to be deployed as a 5G technology.  For the map below, i have indicated 5G channel sizes that are similar to LTE channel sizes except for a 25 MHz channel size which doesn't exist in the LTE framework.  This is in markets where T-Mobile controls 50 MHz of spectrum above the 5 MHz channel LTE network.


600MHz Auction Results and Mobile Carrier Spectrum Depth Analysis April 14, 2017 06:30

We have released a mid-month update to our Mobile Carrier - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool, to include the results of the 600MHz Auction.  The FCC announced the auction winners on 4/13.  Below is a screen shot of our Spectrum Grid reflecting the channel winners and the new 3GPP band class (71) that is already in the standardization process.

Next is an updated National Weighted Average Chart reflecting the average spectrum depth (population weighted average) for Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint, Dish, USCellular, Comcast, and the FCC.  Looking at the low band spectrum summaries, T-Mobile clearly closed the gap on low band spectrum going from a national weighted average of about 8 to 41 MHz.

The image below comes from our County - Spectrum Depth analysis module, depicting the same 8 carriers spectrum depth for the counties in the New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago CMA markets.  This module also details the spectrum holdings in each of these counties by frequency band.

To purchase Allnet Insights products that include the 600MHz auction results use the links below:

Mobile Carrier Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool - $4495

Evaluate all 1900 wireless carriers and spectrum holdings using all of our spectrum depth and LTE channel analysis modules.

Custom Spectrum Depth Report - $1995

Evaluate 8 carriers spectrum depth either by county or by market (CMA, PEA, or EA).  Our suggested 8 carriers are Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint, USCellular, Dish, Comcast and FCC

National Carriers Spectrum Depth Top 100 CMA Markets - $495

Evaluate 6 carriers spectrum depth by CMA market.  This is a standardized monthly report that Allnet Insights provides every month.  The included carriers are Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint, USCellular, and Dish

 


Spectrum Trades - Highlighting Market Spectrum Changes March 10, 2017 14:30

In my most recent post on the filed FCC Transactions for February 2017 there were over 275 call signs that were assigned to new licensees and nearly 100 call signs that were leased.  In an industry driven by spectrum, these changes affect the operations for every wireless carrier, they change site interference, and they affect the channels that are programmed into private repeaters and DAS systems.

So how can your company stay on top of the changes that may affect your markets.  Allnet Insights' publishes a National Carrier Spectrum Depth Report which details the spectrum held by Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint, Dish, and USCellular in the Top 100 Cellular Market Areas (CMA).  We report both the spectrum that each carrier currently holds (Current Holdings) and the spectrum they will hold in the future (Future Holdings) based on pending FCC transactions.  Reporting on both current and future holdings enables Allnet Insights' to also report on the changes between current and future holdings which highlight the location and quantity of spectrum that is changing hands.

Below is a screenshot of the 11th through the 25th most populated CMA markets in our February 2017 report.  This highlights the markets where the national carriers are either increasing or decreasing their spectrum holdings.  In the Excel report you can reveal specific holdings by frequency bands that are changing but for this post, we will stay with the total spectrum view.   From this view, you can see that in San Diego, T-Mobile is increasing their held spectrum by 5MHz while AT&T is decreasing their held spectrum by 5MHz.  The reverse is happening in the Sacramento CMA.

We also highlight the spectrum that is changing hands in our Web Spectrum Viewer.  In the Spectrum Grid menu, we lower case the 3 letter carrier code to indicate that the carrier ownership is changing from the current to the future.  Looking at the same San Diego market (San Diego County) you can see (tmo) on the PCS B6 spectrum.  Since this screen shot is of the Future Holdings, T-Mobile is will control this spectrum in the future.   

Future:

The screen shot below is of the San Diego County Current Holdings. (att) in the PCS B6 column indicates that AT&T is the current operator of the B6 channel. 

Current:

For Sacramento (Placer, Sacramento, and Yolo Counties), we can see that AT&T will be the future operator of the PCS B11 channel and that T-Mobile will be the carrier giving up the PCS B11 channel. 

Future:

Current:

 My last example is in Tucson, AZ.  From the National Carriers Report we can see that T-Mobile is increasing their held spectrum by 10MHz.   

From the Web Spectrum Viewer, it is clear that T-Mobile is receiving the PCS A10 and A11 channels from Commnet (cmm).

Future:

Current: 

 

 


FCC Spectrum Transactions - February 2017 March 06, 2017 06:30

Today, we have released Allnet's Insights' March 2017 Mobile Carrier - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool.  Below are the transactions that have been updated by the FCC from February 1st to February 28th and are included in our update. 

The details for all of the below transactions are available by subscribing to Allnet Insights' Web Tool - Basic Module.  Our Web Tool provides spectrum transaction detail, a spectrum grid of spectrum owners at a county level, and spectrum database covering all mobile carrier frequencies from 600MHz to 2.5 GHz.

Granted Assignments (Assigning Ownership from Assignor to Assignee):

Granted Leases (Leased to Assignee from Assignor):

New Pending Assignments (Assigning Ownership from Assignor to Assignee):

Pending Leases (Leased to Assignee from Assignor):


Network Performance Testing - The Real Winners February 23, 2017 14:30

This week RootMetrics released their 2nd Half 2016 - Mobile Network Performance results which declared Verizon their scorecard winner.  T-Mobile quickly responded with a blog post first diminishing the RootMetrics testing approach, and then touting the crowd sourcing approaches that put their networks in the best light.  So which of these testing approaches provide the best evaluation of a carrier's network.
 
I would say both are necessary to fully evaluate network performance.  The strength of the crowd sourced data collection approaches (Open Signal and Ookla Speedtest) lies in the fact that they collect an immense amount of data in the most populated areas (where most of the people/their testers live, work, and play).  The users can be indoors or outdoors, in a car or walking down the street.
 
The systematic data collection (drive testing and walk testing) that RootMetrics conducts provides a network performance view across a broad sampling of each carrier's network with an equal samples across all areas.
 
So when I see Verizon winning the RootMetrics Scorecard, I see that as winning the network performance trophy across the entire US map, metro areas, suburban, small towns, Interstate Highways, US Highways, and State Highways.  If I live or travel frequently in rural areas, I would want my carrier to score well on the RootMetrics tests.  But RootMetrics doesn't test in your home, your church, or you office so the network performance in those areas would be best measured by crowd sourced data.
 
Winning the Open Signal and Ookla Speedtest is an indication of how each carrier's networks will perform in the more urban markets (think cities of 70,000 people or more).  If I live in one of these areas and rarely need coverage beyond these more urban areas, T-Mobile performs very well. (I am a T-Mobile customer).
Looking at the OpenSignal results for Kalispell, MT; testing results for T-Mobile and Sprint are not included, only AT&T and Verizon.  This is likely because T-Mobile and Sprint have few customer phones in this market since the only store fronts are AT&T and Verizon.
 
As a T-Mobile customer, I have enjoyed great network performance in all of the cities that encountered in 2016 with a very short list of performance challenges that I think are best measured by the RootMetrics Scorecard.
  • I-90 outside of the Seattle area
  • I-10 between Palm Springs and Phoenix
  • Kalispell, MT (lack of in-building service)

As you can see below, a section of I-10 only has Verizon crowd-sourced data.  Specific to this area, T-Mobile won't have any crowd-sourced data because their customers only have access to voice roaming, no data for several large stretches of I-10.


    FCC Spectrum Transactions - January 2017 February 05, 2017 07:30

    Today, we have released Allnet's Insights' February 2017 Mobile Carrier - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool.  Below are the transactions that have been updated by the FCC from January 1 to January 31 and are included in our update. 

    The details for all of the below transactions are available by subscribing to Allnet Insights' Web Tool - Basic Module.  Our Web Tool provides spectrum transaction detail, a spectrum grid of spectrum owners at a county level, and spectrum database covering all mobile carrier frequencies from 700MHz to 2.5 GHz.

    Granted Assignments (Assigning Ownership from Assignor to Assignee):

    Granted Leases (Leased to Assignee from Assignor):

    New Pending Assignments (Assigning Ownership from Assignor to Assignee):

    Pending Leases (Leased to Assignee from Assignor):


    Dish 5G Spectrum from Echostar February 02, 2017 06:30


    Straightpath Canceled Licenses January 17, 2017 06:30

    On January 12th, the FCC released an enforcement action against Straightpath for misrepresenting the construction status of many of their licenses.  As part of this enforcement action, the FCC required Straightpath to cancel 195 licenses.  103 of these licenses were Fixed Point to Point Microwave licenses and the remainder were 39 GHz Economic Area market licenses.   Below is a listing of the cancel EA market licenses.

    Allnet Insights has updated our Millimeter Wave - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool to reflect these canceled licenses.  We have compiled a listing of the remaining licenses in Straightpath's portfolio along with the number of MHz-POPs associated with each license.  

    Email us at info@allnetinsights.com if you would like a copy of the report.  You will receive the report at the conclusion of the 30 minutes Webex demo of our Millimeter Wave - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool.

     Straightpath Canceled Licenses:


    FCC Spectrum Transactions - December 2016 January 05, 2017 18:30

    Today, we have released Allnet's Insights' January 2017 Mobile Carrier - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool.  Below are the transactions that have been updated by the FCC from December 1 to December 31 and are included in our update. 

    The details for all of the below transactions are available by subscribing to Allnet Insights' Web Tool - Basic Module.  Our Web Tool provides spectrum transaction detail, a spectrum grid of spectrum owners at a county level, and spectrum database covering all mobile carrier frequencies from 700MHz to 2.5 GHz.

    Granted Assignments (Assigning Ownership from Assignor to Assignee):

    Granted Leases (Leased to Assignee from Assignor):

    New Pending Assignments (Assigning Ownership from Assignor to Assignee):

    Pending Leases (Leased to Assignee from Assignor):

     


    Sprint's Spectrum for LTE in the PCS Band December 13, 2016 20:46

    In this blog post I am going to explore how Sprint can configure their PCS spectrum for LTE using Allnet Insights' Mobile Carrier Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool.  As a review Sprint's initial LTE deployment utilized a 5 MHz PCS G Block channel.  In the map below I have determined the maximum channel size for spectrum that is contiguous with Sprint's initial LTE channel.  In Seattle, Sprint can expand their initial channel to a 10MHz LTE channel while in Las Vegas Sprint can expand their initial channel to a 20MHz channel.

    Looking at the Las Vegas market area with Allnet Insights' Spectrum Grid Module, you can see the specific channels Sprint controls in each county.  For Clark County, Sprint controls all of the C block channels along with the G block.  Unfortunately for Sprint, they can't use the entire 20MHz for LTE since they still need PCS spectrum for their CDMA voice service.  In Esmeralda County Sprint has 15MHz of spectrum including the G block that should be configured for LTE with 10MHz of the A block channels available for CDMA voice.

     

    The map below details the largest channel size of PCS spectrum that Sprint controls aside from the spectrum contiguous with the G block.  This is the spectrum that can be shared with CDMA voice and could also be deployed in Sprint's FDD-LTE carrier aggregation scheme.


    FCC Spectrum Transactions - November 2016 December 05, 2016 19:30

    Today, we have released Allnet's Insights' December 2016 Mobile Carrier - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool.  Below are the transactions that have been updated by the FCC from November 1 to November 30 and are included in our update. 

    The details for all of the below transactions are available by subscribing to Allnet Insights' Web Tool - Basic Module.  Our Web Tool provides spectrum transaction detail, a spectrum grid of spectrum owners at a county level, and spectrum database covering all mobile carrier frequencies from 700MHz to 2.5 GHz.

    Granted Assignments (Assigning Ownership from Assignor to Assignee):

    Granted Leases (Leased to Assignee from Assignor):

    New Pending Assignments (Assigning Ownership from Assignor to Assignee):

    Pending Leases (Leased to Assignee from Assignor):


    Sprint Available LTE Spectrum in the 2.5 GHz Mid-band Segment (Follow Up) November 15, 2016 22:47

    In an earlier post, I discussed the ability for Sprint to utilize the Mid-Band Segment of their 2.5GHz spectrum band for LTE.  Previously, I had compiled from FCC filings, the BTA markets where video (the original service licensed in the 2.5 GHz band) is still operating.  Since the April 2016 post, Allnet Insights' has investigated below the BTA market level to determine the specific licenses that are still broadcasting video.  This can be seen in Allnet Insights' Web Spectrum Viewer, in the Spectrum Grid menu.

    In the Web Spectrum Viewer, we use the MVU code instead of a typical carrier code (e.g. VZW, SPR, TMO, or ATT) to designate the licenses that are still broadcasting video.  In the Los Angeles CMA market, video is operating on all of the mid-band channels (A4, B4, C4, D4, F4, and E4) for both Los Angeles county, and Orange county.  Sprint can utilize the entire MBS for LTE in the Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

    Los Angeles CMA:

    In the Chicago CMA the G4 channel is used in all 6 counties and the E4 channel is used for video in 3 counties.

    Chicago CMA:

    In the New York CMA, the D4 channel and G4 channel are available for LTE deployment across all but one county in the New York CMA, but the other channels are largely unavailable in the New York CMA.

    New York CMA:

    What is important to Sprint is the size of the LTE channel or channels that they can create using the Mid-band channels.  Using the data from Allnet Insights' Spectrum Grid, we total the number of contiguous channels, rounding to the 3GPP LTE channel sizes of 5, 10, 15, and 20 MHz.  The map below displays the total MHz of the LTE channels that Sprint can create in the Mid-band for each county.


    FCC Spectrum Transactions - October 2016 November 05, 2016 11:00

    Today, we have released Allnet's Insights' November 2016 Mobile Carrier - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool.  Below are the transactions that have been updated by the FCC from October 1 to October 31 and are included in our update. 

    The details for all of the below transactions are available by subscribing to Allnet Insights' Web Tool - Basic Module.  Our Web Tool provides spectrum transaction detail, a spectrum grid of spectrum owners at a county level, and spectrum database covering all mobile carrier frequencies from 700MHz to 2.5 GHz.

    Granted Assignments (Assigning Ownership from Assignor to Assignee):

    Granted Leases (Leased to Assignee from Assignor):

    New Pending Assignments (Assigning Ownership from Assignor to Assignee):

    Pending Leases (Leased to Assignee from Assignor):


    T-Mobile's AWS Band 66 - Largest LTE Channel November 01, 2016 07:30

    Our previous post examined T-Mobile's specific spectrum ownership in the AWS-3 frequency band.  This post will look at T-Mobile's LTE capability for LTE Band Class 66 which encompasses all of the AWS-1 band along with the AWS-3 duplex channels (G, H, I, and J Blocks).  The LTE Channel Analysis Module in Allnet Insights' Mobile Carrier Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool evaluates each carrier's contiguous spectrum holdings across both of these bands to determine the largest LTE channel available (up to 20MHz).  In the chart below you can see how T-Mobile's spectrum holdings in the AWS1 band and AWS3 band vary by county.  For the first 3 counties, T-Mobile can deploy a 20MHz LTE channel in 25MHz of spectrum.  Their AWS3 H Block channel would not initially be deployed.  In the final 3 counties, T-Mobile has only deployed a 15MHz LTE channel in the AWS1 spectrum.  Now with the addition of the AWS3 spectrum they can deploy a 20MHz LTE channel in 25MHz of spectrum.

    Spectrum Grid Module:

    Looking at the LTE Channel Analysis Module, you can see the size of the LTE channels that are available in each county.

    LTE Channel Analysis Module:

    Below we have mapped the largest LTE channel that T-Mobile can deploy using their joint AWS1/AWS3 spectrum.

    The final map in this post indicates the counties where T-Mobile is able to increase the size of their initial AWS LTE channel by adding their Band Class 66 AWS-3 spectrum.

     


    A Look At T-Mobile's AWS-3 Spectrum October 25, 2016 08:30

    With Fierce Wireless' recent article highlighting T-Mobile's inclusion of LTE Band Class 66 in their LG V20 handset, we decided to dig into the markets where T-Mobile has AWS-3 spectrum and try to understand how it will be deployed for LTE.   The Spectrum Blocks map below indicates the counties where T-Mobile controls AWS-3 spectrum along with the specific blocks they control.  The magenta areas indicate that T-Mobile controls the G, H, and I blocks of AWS-3 spectrum.

    Below is band configuration guide from the FCC which indicates the layout of the individual channels.  The AWS-3 G channel is adjacent to the AWS-1 F channel.

     

     The channel size map below indicates the largest LTE channel size (5x5, 10x10, or 15x15) that could be deployed using only T-Mobile's AWS-3 spectrum.

     The last map depicts the counties where T-Mobile's AWS-3 spectrum is contiguous with their existing LTE deployed in the AWS-1 spectrum.  These are areas where T-Mobile could increase the LTE channel size if they haven't already their desire wide band LTE values of 15 or 20MHz channel

     

    To develop these maps, we utilized several analysis modules within Allnet Insights' Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool.  First we utilized the Spectrum Grid Analysis Module to confirm the channel alignment for both the AWS-1 and AWS-3 frequency bands.  For the AWS-1 and AWS-3 spectrum blocks the channels are lettered consistently from A to J (lowest frequency to highest frequency).  This is critical to understand what channels are adjacent to each other.  The lettering of channels in most of the mobile carrier frequency bands does not straightforward like the AWS-1 and AWS-2 frequency blocks.

    Below is a portion of our Spectrum Grid for the New York, NY and Los Angeles, CA counties.

    Once we confirmed that what channels are adjacent to the AWS-1 block, we utilized the Channel Blocks Analysis Module to determine on a county by county basis, whether T-Mobile owned the spectrum adjacent to the AWS-3 frequencies (AWS-1 F Block) and whether they also owned contiguous spectrum adjacent to the AWS-1 F Block (either G, G and H, or G, H, and I).  The markets where T-Mobile controls the J channel, they don't control the I channel so the J channel won't be contiguous to any of their existing spectrum.

    In the example below, I have highlighted 3 counties in the Beaumont-Port Arthur, TX CMA where the addition of the AWS-3 G channel will allow T-Mobile to expand their LTE channel from 15MHz to 20MHz.  The values in each of the Channel Blocks columns represent the spectrum depth for each of those channels held by T-Mobile.  Each of these spectrum depth values need to be cut in half to represent the LTE channel size.  This is because 1/2 of each channel's spectrum is used for the cell site's transmitting (downlink) LTE channel and the other 1/2 is used for the cell site's receiving (uplink) LTE channel.


    Spectrum Ownership Viewer and Spectrum Database October 18, 2016 19:00

    The shutdown of the FCC Spectrum Dashboard leaves a large void in user friendly access to FCC Spectrum Ownership Data as we illustrated in our FCC Spectrum Dashboard - The Final Episode Blog. A much better solution is the Spectrum Ownership View and Spectrum Database in Allnet's Web - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool.  

                                                              

    Once logged into the web site, the Spectrum Grid view for the entire country is seen.

    Spectrum Grid:

    The Band menu indicates that we are looking mid-band spectrum ownership which includes PCS.  Using region to select CO_Denver County, provides a detail view of the mid-band spectrum ownership for all carriers in Denver County.  From this view, you can see that Sprint controls the first 10 MHz of the A block spectrum and AT&T controls the remaining 5 MHz of the A block spectrum.

    Clicking on the first Sprint cell, allows the user to extract the following details about that licenses.

    With this detailed view, the call sign (KNLF243) and the current licensee (Wirelessco, L.P.) are both apparent.  When building our spectrum database, we not only combined the licensee and lease information, which were seperate and unmatched in the FCC Spectrum Dashboard, but will also indicate the current operator for each block of spectrum as well as the future operator, if the spectrum is subject to a pending transaction.

    The Web - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool module that most parallels the FCC Spectrum Dashboard in our Database Query Tool.  The database query tool allows the user to identify individual or groups of licenses that meet many different criteria, such as, frequency band, market, licensee name, state, or county.

    Spectrum Database Queries:

    The other modules contained in Allnet's Web - Spectrum Ownership Analysis Tool exceed the FCC Spectrum Dashboard scope.

    The Transactions Module details all of the FCC filed transactions for the mobile carrier and millimeter wave frequency bands.  Each application is listed and selecting the details button, reveals the status of each application and which call signs, counties, markets, and frequency blocks are included.

    Transactions Module:

    The last module details each of the licensee names and how they map to the commonly known carrier names.

    Carriers Module: